It has been almost four months since I posted an entry but I had to break hibernation to do put this together.  Recently the Jamaican society has become a platform for an onslaught blame games.  Every sector has been slammed for some amount of break down of the Jamaican society.  Politicians have been feeling the heat for the state of the country’s economy, more so the loss of value of the Jamaican dollar and they also are being blamed for the lack of vision which has been tagged as the cause of the crime in the country; a blame they share with musical artistes alike.  Speaking of artistes, the Jamaican music industry too has been taking some battering based on the lack of initiative from the artistes, the ‘filthy’ and ‘tasteless’ lyrics that are being produced and the contribution of parties to the disturbance of the peace.  The latter point has seen a bill being tabled in parliament to enforce the 2 am cease and desist order of all parties.  While blames have taken flight the quality music that we all have been yearning is being created but have been flying under the radar.  My need to make this post is not to break my hiatus but to highlight the work of two young men who have created, in my opinion, the two best songs so far for 2013.

The first is a song titled A No Kill by Cee Gee.  The song is a Dancehall track produced on Hugh Lynch’s (Noze) ‘Hottest Riddim’, the song is laced with witty rhymes and a sick flow.  The flow is smooth and melodic which brings with it a very high level of clarity; an element which is missing from many of today’s Dancehall artistes.  The song is a social commentary piece that highlights the modern day happenings in the lives of low income earning Jamaicans, which seems like the successor to Baby Cham’s 1999 Desperate Measures.  The song demands your attention not only because of the riddim but due to the energy and the command of the artiste on the riddim.  It has indeed been a while since a true social commentary piece has been delivered with such confidence which would offer it total success.  The only problem is, the song is not getting the attention it truly deserves.  I heard the song twice on a single Jamaican radio station, FAME95 FM, played by two separate radio personalities; DJ Kevin and Captain Collin Hines.  These Disc Jocks must be commended because while others are trying to gain, keep up and flirt with the fortune and fame that being popular can afford them, they have been playing quality music hardly heard but in great demand.  Therefore, the disloyalty and greed that exist in the music industry are ingredients for disaster; not the pressure that is being levied by the government.

 

A No Kill

Cee Gee

Hottest Riddim

INTRO

*Hiss Teethh*

Bongo cart got four wheel pan it

Di youth dem tired fi see plate without meal on it

That’s why so much a dem a get demonic

Cho, di poor tired fi suffer

VERSE 1

Mama got ten pikini imagine the pressure weh she one bare, di pressure weh she on bare

Haffi gi di pikni dem di bed fi sleep and she go sleep pan chair, gi dem di bed and she go sleep pan chair

A di same likkle woman weh yu treat and care

And a fi har son yu gi di gun fi keep and care

And yu never g idem a bread fi eat and share

Now di same likkle gun is the policeman’s fear

VERSE 2

It no tek a scientist fi know se life nice

But it no nice when yu haffi wrestle high price

Yu share di cake but still yu never gi mi my slice

So when mi do di necessary a no my choice

A dem same set a people deh did fight Christ

And dem a bound we to di chicken back and white rice

And dem a try fi trick di people dem with dem nice voice

But di youth dem still a try fi mek di right choice

CHORUS

But a no kill dem love fi kill a no kill dem love fi kill

Dem go school go learn a skill and kyaa find nutten fi do still

But a no kill dem love fi kill a no kill dem love fi kill

But if dem hungry and yu gi dem gun a more blood a go spill

But a no kill dem love fi kill a no kill dem love fi kill

Dem go heart go learn a skill and kyaa find nutten fi do still

But a no kill dem love fi kill a no kill dem love fi kill

But if dem hungry and yu gi dem gun blood a go run

  

VERSE 3

Tell dem this

Tin mackerel and white rice keep us alive

Lasco porridge and hard dough bread

We hustle in the street just for us to survive

But we tired a di cardboard bed

Yes a dat mi say tired a di cardboard

Di youth dem try fi trod the rocky street but it’s a hard road

Wi pocket empty and dem waa load

So yu better set up or get up we ready fi block all road

To how di situation tan bad

Mi likkle bredda gone a jail fi grab a handbag

If dem did try uplift di ghetto people standard

Dem wuda never haffi say a ghetto man bad

Dem use lies stroke we ego like a hand job

And that is why Jamaica soon tun ina Baghdad

Yu know it bad when a family sharing one rag

Or when a woman a struggle fi buy a one pad

CHORUS

Cause a no kill dem love fi kill a no kill dem love fi kill

Dem go school go learn a skill and kyaa get nutten fi do still

But a no kill dem love fi kill a no kill dem love fi kill

But if dem hungry and yu gi dem gun a more blood a go spill

But a no kill dem love fi kill a no kill dem love fi kill

Dem go Heart go learn a skill and kyaa get nutten fi do still

But a no kill dem love fi kill a no kill dem love fi kill

But if dem hungry and yu gi dem gun blood a go run

VERSE 4

Just today mama got news that daddy was gun down

Just days before the fifth child born

Now she’s a single mother living down town and the bread winner of the house is gone!

The second song is a contrast of the first, an easy going Reggae song; Smile Jamaica  done by Chronixx on Silly Walks Discotheque’s ‘Honey Pot Riddim’.  The song is one typical of the artiste who brings a new dimension to the Reggae music with his unique voice and melody and metaphor–laced but powerful lyrics.  The song highlights Chronixx’s sense of imagination when he sings about a girl he met and interacted with whom he later revealed introduced herself as Jamaica.  The song’s uniqueness lies with its seeming love song feel accompanied with elements of social commentary; an unheard, if you ask me, combination.  The song’s video was premiered on Winford Williams’ Onstage programme during an interview with Chronixx.  The premiere was my introduction to the song and since then (April 27th) I have only heard the song once; again on FAME 95.

The vibe these music bring with them is one of happiness and soulfulness but still they are often overshadowed by the typical songs that are here only for a week after which they lose their zeal and interest.  The Jamaican music industry has been the foundation of many subcultures and art forms but recently, there seems to be a sense of disunity and selfishness that the detractors use as the opening to split the industry.  The music is the asset from which all subsystems are created and if quality music isn’t promoted then the supporters of the music are going to get bored and venture elsewhere for their source of unique enjoyment.  Unity is strength is not a cliché; it only becomes a cliché when it stops being true.  The music industry is big enough for everyone so there is no need to fight for control.  The agents of the music hold the power to their destiny in their hands they need to seize control of it.

Smile Jamaica

Chronixx

Honey Pot Riddim

INTRO

Whoa Whoa Waiyo

Smile for me smile for me

Whooo lord

Yes I

Smile for me smile for me

VERSE 1
Oooh I met a girl this morning
She was love at first sight
Oooooh I met a girl this morning
And she was beauty to my eyes
I asked her where she from she tell me in the Tropics
She asked me what’s my name
I tell her I am Chronixx
And I said girl tell me what’s your name
And she tell me that her name is Jamaica

CHORUS
And I said smile girl smile
Smile for me Jamaica
And I said smile girl smile
Smile for me Jamaica
Never you cry
Here am iI
I’m here for you Jamaica
Dry your eyes
Girl smile

Smile for me Jamaica
Lord

VERSE 2
She have a rich history
A beautiful woman with the sweetest gifts
Beautiful sunrise and an evening kiss
Of a nice sunset on the evening seas
But she tell me say she tired
Tired of di exploit and liars
She gi dem reggae gi dem  beaches gi dem flowers and di ferns
All she got was abusing in turn

HOOK
But I said
Don’t you worry yourself mama
Chronixx is here to help mama
I said no worry yourself mommy
A one ting mi a beg you do for me

CHORUS
And I said smile girl smile
Smile for me Jamaica
And I said smile girl smile
Smile for me Jamaica
Never you cry
Here am I

Girl
I’m here for you Jamaica
What must I try, oh my
A dat she ask me an’ dis a weh me say

VERSE 3
A sweet, sweet Chronixx yuh fi gi dem, gi dem
The one drop beat pan a riddim riddim
A you gi dem Bob wid a different stepping
A you gi dem Bolt, nobody kyaa run lef him

Ooooohhh
But si yah, dem mussi think se you outta ideas
You gi dem art and sweet literature
Yu a go mek di world see the betta picture

HOOK
I say no worry yourself mama
Chronixx is here to your help mama
I say no worry yourself mommy
A one thing me a beg you do for me

CHORUS
And I said smile girl smile
Smile for me Jamaica
And I said smile girl smile
Smile for me Jamaica
Never you cry
Here am I

Girl
I’m here for you Jamaica
and I say smile girl smile smile for me Jamaica

wowooaaahhh

Music such as these will be the barriers that naysayers have to break through to derail the Jamaican subculture of music and all its subsystems; I call them music with a defence.

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